Product Safety Recalls: Pelican Kayaks – Catch Hydryve 13 and Elie STRAIGHT 120, 120XE, 140, and 140XE









Since both kayak recalls involve the integrity of the hull, you’ll want to take care of this one if you haven’t already.  If you own either of these kayaks, or know someone who does, here’s what you need to know. 


Summary Of The Safety Recalls

In our experience and gear reviews, Pelican kayaks are generally very high quality.  These are specific, correctable potential defects to what are otherwise some of the best kayaks for fly fishing.

Pelican and the US Coast Guard issued a voluntary recall of kayak models that may have compromised rudder or keel assemblies.  This in turn can lead to leaks in the hull and therefore compromise buoyancy.

Many kayaks purchased before these recalls still haven’t been retrofitted, and are now reaching the age where failure could be more likely.  More specifically, the Catch Hydryve 13 recall was issued in 2019, and the Elie STRAIGHT 120, STRAIGHT 120XE, STRAIGHT 140, and STRAIGHT 140XE were recalled in 2017.

A picture of the Catch Hydryve 13 is shown above in our cover slide, while the Elie sea kayak touring models are shown below.

Immediate Action

Stop using the kayak!   You can also get a free repair kit with modified parts, by contacting Pelican at the information below for more specific instructions.

Of course, while our articles focus on how to use fly fishing kayaks, and give gear reviews on choosing the best fly fishing kayaks, anyone who already owns one of these should get it retrofitted.  See video below with nice close up shots and explanations of how a failed Hydryve was fixed.

Details Of The Safety Hazard

Pelican states that these kayak models may have a potential hull leaks, which may compromise the craft’s buoyancy.  The issue may stem from weakness in the rudder assembly materials (Catch Hydryve 13), or in the keel assembly (Elie STRAIGHT models).

To be even more specific, the rivets on the assemblies of the Catch Hydryve 13 have the potential to fail, and then in turn these tears in the hull can cause leakage.  In the case of the Elie STRAIGHT models, there is a weakness in the keel assembly, specifically in the part that joins the keel to the hull.

Of course, water entering the hull will decrease buoyancy and therefore potentially your safety.


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Kayak Part Modifications

Pelican states that to correct the situation, they made changes to the part that brings together the keel and the hull.  They also changed the type of insert used.  Finally, they have also improved their manufacturing and assembly methods, to approve keel shock resistance and to ensure proper sealing.  Once this is done, you can safely use them as fly fishing kayaks.

Style and Model Numbers At Risk:

For The Catch Hydryve 13 – If you have one with the Hull ID Number (also known as the HIN), that has a total of 12 numbers, preceded by the letters ZEP, and also finishes with the four-digit series K819, L819, A919, B919, C919, or D919, then you should contact Pelican.

For The Elie STRAIGHT 120, STRAIGHT 120XE, STRAIGHT 140, and STRAIGHT 140XE – If you have one of these models, with a 12-character serial number (HIN) beginning with the letters ZEP, and then ending with any of the series D313 to L313, 314, 414, 415, or 515, then you should contact Pelican.

We thought at this time of year, when many anglers are avidly heading out to go kayak fly fishing, or looking to buy a kayak for fly fishing, it’s one of the best times to think about safety.

For Additional Information

Website: go to www.pelicansport.com/recall, and there you’ll find more detailed instructions you can follow explicitly.

Phone: call 1-888-669-6960, ext. 24

Email: you can alternatively send an email specifically to recall@pelicansport.com.


Next Article: Best Kayak Fishing Accessories that will make a long day fly fishing from a kayak much more comfortable!

Watch Video: Pelican Hydryve One Week After Failure – we like this video for its close-up view of the Hydryve and nice explanation of its working parts – thanks Russell Huff!